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Ty Segall and White Fence - Joy - LP -

Price per Unit (stuk): €28.95


It seemed preordained that the two giants of West Coast rock’n’roll would work together at some point. In 2012, Ty Segall and Tim Presley were both in the middle of a hot streak. Segall was putting out new music at a clip, oscillating between the low-key garage rock of Goodbye Bread and the obliterating punk wildness of Slaughterhouse. As White Fence, Presley was overflowing with psychedelic pop ideas, putting out over six dozen songs between 2010 and 2013. Segall approached Presley at a show, as one does, and they decided to make a split album. But when they got in the studio together, the plan quickly changed and their shred-heavy jam sessions became stoner opus Hair—a high point in each man’s long discography.

Even with both men playing on every song, in certain places Hair still sounded like a split. The fuzzed-out and glammy Marc Bolan worship of Segall’s “Crybaby” is obviously the work of the guy who made a tribute album called Ty Rex, and the Presley-penned “(I Can’t) Get Around You” sounds like a White Fence song with a boilerplate Segall guitar solo. As a team, however, they were instantly soluble. Especially on “Scissor People” and “Time,” their voices glommed together in unison as their guitars—occasionally gentle but also mega-burly—intertwined. More than a vanity team-up, this was the work of two people who wrote in a shared sunbaked, psychedelic language.

Six years and so many records later, they’ve locked into their hive mind once again. Every song on the second Ty and White Fence album Joy is a co-write, and there’s never a moment where one guy overpowers the other. There’s an introduction to “Please Don’t Leave This Town” that shares similarities to several of Presley’s more reserved moments, but it’s balanced by a vocal harmony and guitar solo that carry Segall’s distinct influence. When they start singing, an abstract narrative takes form—something murky about being made of dough and being asked to leave town forever.

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