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Prong - Zero Days - CD -

Price per Unit (stuk): €19.95


Alternative metal bands are a rare species; Prong is still a hungry beast that makes music to rip your ears off with its deafening riffs. The New York City outfit are known for melting music genres as their creative formula, they’ve been making innovative and cutting edge metal for the last 31 years and there’s no sign of them stopping now as a brand new album entitled Zero Days’ is about to be unleashed upon their loyal and dedicated fan base.

Prong’s audience is still growing even in 2017 as a new generation of rock and metal fans are discovering the hidden gems of the industrial, hardcore and thrash metal era of the early 90’s. The band started at a time when metal musicians use to experiment and there’s no other album in their discography that exemplified this drive better than their breakthrough 1994 release Cleansing’. As Prong’s best selling album to date it catapulted them into mainstream success with groove metal anthems like “Snap your fingers, Snap your Neck” and got them touring alongside their better known contemporaries Pantera and White Zombie.

 

The band’s influence is also evident in many of the acts that came after them, Even Australian band Grinspoon did a cover of “Snap your fingers, Snap your Neck” back in 98. Throughout the years Prong has gone through various line-up changes but has always remained a 3 piece with front man and lead guitarist Tommy Victor being the founder and only permanent member. ‘Zero Days’ will be Tommy’s 12th studio album but after all these years does Prong still have the artistic ammunition in their creative arsenal?

From the very opening song “However It May End” ‘Zero Days’ starts with an aggressive thrash riff and Tommy Victor’s screaming vocals sounding very much like Max Cavalera. The title song is straight hardcore chaos with the occasional off-beat rhythm before returning to a thrash metal shredding extravaganza. “Off the Grid” is a speeding train that’s out of control but the chorus does slow the engine down a little. On “Divide and Conquer” Tommy Victor sings with mighty conviction about the hard times we all face in life, the lyrics in the chorus say: “you can’t go through life without some division, you’re going through time in your own prison, you can’t go through life without these conditions, you can always rely upon opposition” is food for thought.

Breaks in Tommy Victor’s career, which includes a position in Danzig’s band, are a rarity, especially for his main project Prong. With genre-defining albums dating back over two decades, including their 1994 album Cleansing, Prong’s distinctive groove have made them a household name. Now on their twelfth full-length, Zero Days marks the fourth consecutive year in a row in which the band has released an album; a testament to their ability to deliver consistently.

Zero Days follows what is now known as the typical Prong sound — a mixture of industrial metal, thrash, hardcore, and a distinctly nineties penchant for groove (see the album’s eponymous track). Of the more recent material that Victor’s collective has released, this album seems about on par consistency-wise with 2014’s Ruining Lives as opposed to the relatively forgettable X — No Absolutes. Back to front, Zero Days has total consistency — no unfitting tracks like the odd “Belief System” from X — No Absolutes which sounds like the wrong kind of Sepultura song gone deathcore.

Adding certain textural elements to the fray, we now hear harsh, throaty screams behind Victor’s signature yell — something even weathered fans would not have expected ten years ago. Now over a quarter century old, Beg to Differ seems so long ago, but Zero Days makes Prong’s thrash roots clear. Victor certainly keeps up the intensity, resulting in the band’s heaviest album in quite some time.

Ironically, the album cover showcases an American flag of sorts, in line with Victor’s clearly defined political opinions. With tracks like “Forced Into Intolerance” and “Operation of Moral Law,” the album’s concentration on moral ideology is abundantly clear. It is Victor’s belief that Donald Trump is metal too, via a recent interview on Blabbermouth; at least in a sense of counterculture and going against the general grain.

Will Prong put out a new album in 2018? It’s likely, yes, but that is ultimately up to Victor and the whims of his writing process. For fans of Prong, Zero Days is another in a long line of solid releases for the band. Zero Days is Prong in 2017: a solid thrash-heavy album with tendencies leaning toward the band’s salad days of industrial music. Victor shows no signs of slowing down, and if the release pattern and quality are any sign of his intent, then fans should continue to be excited.



Read More: Prong – “Zero Days” (Album Review) | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/prong-zero-days/?trackback=tsmclip

Breaks in Tommy Victor’s career, which includes a position in Danzig’s band, are a rarity, especially for his main project Prong. With genre-defining albums dating back over two decades, including their 1994 album Cleansing, Prong’s distinctive groove have made them a household name. Now on their twelfth full-length, Zero Days marks the fourth consecutive year in a row in which the band has released an album; a testament to their ability to deliver consistently.

Zero Days follows what is now known as the typical Prong sound — a mixture of industrial metal, thrash, hardcore, and a distinctly nineties penchant for groove (see the album’s eponymous track). Of the more recent material that Victor’s collective has released, this album seems about on par consistency-wise with 2014’s Ruining Lives as opposed to the relatively forgettable X — No Absolutes. Back to front, Zero Days has total consistency — no unfitting tracks like the odd “Belief System” from X — No Absolutes which sounds like the wrong kind of Sepultura song gone deathcore.

Adding certain textural elements to the fray, we now hear harsh, throaty screams behind Victor’s signature yell — something even weathered fans would not have expected ten years ago. Now over a quarter century old, Beg to Differ seems so long ago, but Zero Days makes Prong’s thrash roots clear. Victor certainly keeps up the intensity, resulting in the band’s heaviest album in quite some time.

Ironically, the album cover showcases an American flag of sorts, in line with Victor’s clearly defined political opinions. With tracks like “Forced Into Intolerance” and “Operation of Moral Law,” the album’s concentration on moral ideology is abundantly clear. It is Victor’s belief that Donald Trump is metal too, via a recent interview on Blabbermouth; at least in a sense of counterculture and going against the general grain.

Will Prong put out a new album in 2018? It’s likely, yes, but that is ultimately up to Victor and the whims of his writing process. For fans of Prong, Zero Days is another in a long line of solid releases for the band. Zero Days is Prong in 2017: a solid thrash-heavy album with tendencies leaning toward the band’s salad days of industrial music. Victor shows no signs of slowing down, and if the release pattern and quality are any sign of his intent, then fans should continue to be excited.

Read More: Prong – “Zero Days” (Album Review) | http://www.invisibleoranges.com/prong-zero-days/?trackback=tsmclip

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